I believe we have a common calling to delight one another. Once we get to answering that call on the regular, we never want to live any other way. To see the people we share a community with as playful volumes of light, and to be witnessed as such, does a body good. It is restorative.  It is collective joy, and we need it. We have a need to meet in another space, above and away from the clamor of the day to laugh and dance together. We need traditions to remind us that we have capacity for collective joy because we forget.

We have seen the rise of lantern parades during an extraordinarily divisive decade in our country. In our current climate, joyful actions are defiant. Make a lantern and walk in the parade is a very different call to action. It is the call to delight one another, and we are answering it resoundingly. Humans can do this. 

I believe there is a need for recurring occasions that value individual creative expression, where a community experiences its illuminated self. As traditions, participatory creative celebrations reinforce our belief in the extraordinary nature of our collective character. I strive to create a platform for this experience.

Chantelle Rytter is a parade artist best known for founding the Atlanta BeltLine Lantern Parade with the Krewe of the Grateful Gluttons, of which she is the proud Captain. Chantelle has created a family of annual lantern parades based in community participation over the last ten years in Decatur, Sandy Springs, Midtown, and Hilton Head Island. Chantelle grew up in Baltimore and studied integrative arts at Penn State University. She lived in New Orleans for ten years and fell under the spell of parade culture and the notion that creative play can be a civic gift. 

"Civic play connects people to place."

c@chantellerytter.com | 678.612.2570

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